Welcome to our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.
Sign up

Understanding HDR.

Liger 1956

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 28, 2018
Messages
994
Reaction score
354
Location
Manchester, UK
Very interesting Leif. I watched all of it and am now wiser and confused at the same time. The video is dated 2017 so things may be better now but I have no intention in upgrading my plasma TV or computer monitor at the moment.
 

Seitenwerk

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2018
Messages
195
Reaction score
153
Be aware not to mistake HDR photography/video with the new HDR playback/monitors/material.

While with the first you basically try to take multiple images of the same scene in different exposures to merge them and create an image which has both light and dark parts of the scene perfectly captured (which is comparable to how the human eye sees the world, as we usually see both shadows and highlights at the same time if the contrast is not extreme, while cameras can only really set their exposure to either capture one of both)

HDR on monitors/TVs/Games etc on the other hand refers to a high dynamic range of colors and contrast. Which basically means a much wider spectrum of displayable colors, and highlights/shadows.

So while both are about high dynamic range they mean different things in the end.

We could easily capture a HDR image with our phones just by adjusting exposure, taking at least 3 images and merging them together. But creating HDR content as I described in the second part would require cameras which can record all those colors and brightness levels.

Please correct me if I am wrong, but Anafis HDR feature refers to the first meaning of HDR. It doesn’t produce a „HDR“ video which is only playable when you have the right TV. Instead it records multiple exposures at once and merges them to capture as much detail as possible for both highlights and shadow parts of the image at the same time. This of course will lead to more noise if you use it in darker lighting conditions (as multiple noisy images will get merged). So alway decide when to use it. If you don’t try to film scenes which benefit from HDR (like a bright sky and dark shadows on the ground) it’s usually better to not use HDR as otherwise the colors and brightness may seem to be off or oversaturated.
 
Last edited:

Landbo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 5, 2018
Messages
753
Reaction score
305
Location
NW Denmark.
Be aware not to mistake HDR photography/video with the new HDR playback/monitors/material.

While with the first you basically try to take multiple images of the same scene in different exposures to merge them and create an image which has both light and dark parts of the scene perfectly captured (which is comparable to how the human eye sees the world, as we usually see both shadows and highlights at the same time if the contrast is not extreme, while cameras can only really set their exposure to either capture one of both)

HDR on monitors/TVs/Games etc on the other hand refers to a high dynamic range of colors and contrast. Which basically means a much wider spectrum of displayable colors, and highlights/shadows.

So while both are about high dynamic range they mean different things in the end.

We could easily capture a HDR image with our phones just by adjusting exposure, taking at least 3 images and merging them together. But creating HDR content as I described in the second part would require cameras which can record all those colors and brightness levels.

Please correct me if I am wrong, but Anafis HDR feature refers to the first meaning of HDR. It doesn’t produce a „HDR“ video which is only playable when you have the right TV. Instead it records multiple exposures at once and merges them to capture as much detail as possible for both highlights and shadow parts of the image at the same time. This of course will lead to more noise if you use it in darker lighting conditions (as multiple noisy images will get merged). So alway decide when to use it. If you don’t try to film scenes which benefit from HDR (like a bright sky and dark shadows on the ground) it’s usually better to not use HDR as otherwise the colors and brightness may seem to be off or oversaturated.

I suppose that our Anafi camera is an HDR10 + image, which is Google's version of an HDR image/video. HDR10 + is also the latest coming edition for/to the HDR family. In fact, I suppose the computer in our Anafi uses Google's Android as its OS.

However, we still lack those cheap consumer displays that can display a "real" HDR image.

Regards, Leif.
 

Seitenwerk

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2018
Messages
195
Reaction score
153
I suppose that our Anafi camera is an HDR10 + image, which is Google's version of an HDR image/video. HDR10 + is also the latest coming edition for/to the HDR family. In fact, I suppose the computer in our Anafi uses Google's Android as its OS.

However, we still lack those cheap consumer displays that can display a "real" HDR image.

Regards, Leif.

Are you sure? I am not sure if the Anafis HDR is a HDR image in the sense of colour range etc. from what i have seen the produced video file doesn’t even have any HDR info (could be wrong of course). I imagine the Anafis HDR is just a HDR as in the sense of merging multiple exposures like I described above, that’s basically also what parrot says on their website.
 

Landbo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 5, 2018
Messages
753
Reaction score
305
Location
NW Denmark.
Very interesting Leif. I watched all of it and am now wiser and confused at the same time. The video is dated 2017 so things may be better now but I have no intention in upgrading my plasma TV or computer monitor at the moment.

It will no doubt be cheapest to wait until a winner in the HDR war has been found. And the screens that have to show our HDR image/video must also be much cheaper.

I think the video in a clear language tells how HDR works.

Regards, Leif.
 

Agustine

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 30, 2018
Messages
3,573
Reaction score
2,107
Location
Ontario Canada
Someone did a interview with one of the Parrots executives a while back and he was asked that very question if it was HDR10 + and he said no. Not even close. I should start book marking these interviews LOL now to find that darn thing. :)
 

Seitenwerk

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2018
Messages
195
Reaction score
153
That’s what I think too. According to the websites description (marketing blabla) I guess parrot Anafis HDR is the classic exposure merge HDR every photographer knows and uses since many many years and iPhones or other smartphones automatically create. I don’t think it’s a HDR10/DolbyVision or HDR10+/Samsung/Panasonic HDR.

At least I couldn’t find anything about it. But I guess looking at the created video files, someone could see if it’s in fact a HDR video file or just a normal video.
 

Landbo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 5, 2018
Messages
753
Reaction score
305
Location
NW Denmark.
Are you sure? I am not sure if the Anafis HDR is a HDR image in the sense of colour range etc. from what i have seen the produced video file doesn’t even have any HDR info (could be wrong of course). I imagine the Anafis HDR is just a HDR as in the sense of merging multiple exposures like I described above, that’s basically also what parrot says on their website.

How to make a video with high dynamic range from the camera's sensor has nothing to do with an HDR video standard. What makes an HDR video image different to the SDR format is the metadata you put into the video stream along with the image. The metadata describes how the video stream should be processed by the screen if it is to be displayed as an HDR video. The standard is named Rec. 2020 for HDR10.

Rec. 2020 - Wikipedia

In the first HDR from Anafi there was no metadata in the video stream. If they have changed that when the HDR algorithm was redone, I have not investigated. But it is probably a "half" HDR standard that Parrot uses.

Regards, Leif.
 

rsjVERG

Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2018
Messages
13
Reaction score
9
The Anafi camera has a Sony IMX230 sensor which is capable of capturing Single Frame High Dynamic Range (HDR) with equivelant full pixels. So it actually captures HDR video directly without the need to combine multiple exposures.
 

Seitenwerk

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 24, 2018
Messages
195
Reaction score
153
How to make a video with high dynamic range from the camera's sensor has nothing to do with an HDR video standard. What makes an HDR video image different to the SDR format is the metadata you put into the video stream along with the image. The metadata describes how the video stream should be processed by the screen if it is to be displayed as an HDR video. The standard is named Rec. 2020 for HDR10.

Rec. 2020 - Wikipedia

In the first HDR from Anafi there was no metadata in the video stream. If they have changed that when the HDR algorithm was redone, I have not investigated. But it is probably a "half" HDR standard that Parrot uses.

Regards, Leif.

So my assumption was correct then from what I understand. That would also be coherent with the marketing description of parrot which just say that it’s HDR captures the infos of both dark and light parts of the images. Which is basically what capturing HDR images via exposure merge is.
 

Latest threads

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
4,054
Messages
36,852
Members
5,426
Latest member
g7kdq